Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Changing the name of Confederate Drive at Ole Miss is violation of state law

    There's a little glitch in Ole Miss Chancellor Dan Jones' plan to desecrate the memory of our Confederate War dead by changing the name of the spur road that serves to access the cemetery. He announced plans last Friday to change the name of the road from Confederate Drive to Chapel Lane.
    Such a name change is apparently against the law.
    Mississippi Code 55-15-81 provides that most streets named in honor of military units, organizations or events may not be renamed. This would certainly include a street serving a Confederate cemetery, named in memory of the men interred therein.
    Dan Jones has shown an unwillingness to adhere to the Ole Miss Creed regarding civil discourse. His hatred of Ole Miss and its history is so great that now he wants to break the law to erase memorials to the dead. Isn't it time we had a chancellor who would adhere to the Ole Miss Creed and obey the law?

    The relevant code section reads as follows:
(1) None of the following items, structures or areas may be relocated, removed, disturbed, altered, renamed or rededicated: Any Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Mexican-American War, War Between the States, Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War, War in Iraq or Native American Wars statues, monuments, memorials or nameplates (plaques), which have been erected on public property of the state or any of its political subdivisions, such as local, municipal or county owned public areas, and any statues, monuments, memorials, nameplates (plaques), schools, streets, bridges, buildings, parks preserves, reserves or other public items, structure or areas of the state or any of its political subdivisions, such as, local, municipal or county owned public areas, which have been dedicated in memory of, or named for, any historical military figure, historical military event, military organization or military unit.

UPDATE AND ADDENDUM: In the space of 10 hours this has become the second-most-read post I've had on this blog, as determined by direct click-throughs. Of course, I do have a few regular readers who just type in the blog name (in fact, I think this is becoming more common).

I really did not come up with this idea on my own. Someone posted a comment on Facebook which cited a Senate or House bill, not the code section. I read this on my phone, and when I tried to find the post on my computer I couldn't. I wanted to give whoever it was credit. But to whoever it was, next time cite the code section! You made me do some work. Also, my good friend John Cofield said he was aware of this information for the past few days and was just waiting for someone to publish it.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

This also includes adding to or placing on any proganda plaques to any Statue or other things erected on Campus that has been placed there for remeberance. Which in tune makes any effort to alters their purpose or meaning for being there and defaceing them. Jones already knew that before and when ahead and made a proposal to break the Law in the Case, in the position he serves he should resign and if he does not and this has to go to court he should be terminated.

frank rooker class of 1976 said...

apparently Mr.Jones (the absence of any educational title is intentional) is trying to imitate Obama when it comes to following laws.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous #1 must have learned spelling and punctuation in Alabama. Certainly not in Mississippi.
Love Ole Miss!

Anonymous said...

HATE IT WHEN people make remarks about grammar which was obviously done or typed in a hurry. Get over yourself please! Great post about this law.

Pugnacious said...

Google "Jewish Lebanese Surnames," then you'll understand Kayhat's vitriolic hatred of anything Southern.

Col. Reb Sez said...

I doubt that Robert Khayat is a crypto-Jew, but aside from that I have not found Southern Jews to be in any way hostile to anything Southern. One of the most prominent members of the Confederate government was Judah Benjamin, a Jew. Throughout the small towns of the Delta Jews have managed to be pretty popular, and they have not managed that by being "haters."

Pugnacious said...

Yes, Judah P. Benjamin made a great secessionist speech in Congress and he(Benjamin) was Davis' personal choice to cabinet minister(attorney General?) at Montgomery. Benjamin was popular with the ladies of Montgomery, too. He was a "quarter of a man," according to historian William Davis in his book, The Making of the Confederacy: A Government of Our Own.

Doing like the Gentiles do, according to Randy Newman.

From Randy Newman Newman's Land of Dreams Album.
Dixie Flyer



"..Her own mother came to meet us at the station,
Her dress as black as a crow in a coal mine
She cried when her little girl got off the train.
Her brothers and her sisters drove down from Jackson, Mississippi in a great green Hudson driven by a Gentile they knew.
Drinkin' rye whiskey from a flask in the back seat
Tryin' to do like the Gentiles do
Christ, they wanted to be Gentiles, too.
Who wouldn't down there, wouldn't you?
An American Christian, God damn!"

ScottS said...

does anyone have an update on changing Confederate Dr. to Chapel Lane? can't find any news on it.